Evaluation of three attachment style theories

By Saul McLeodupdated Attachment is a deep and enduring emotional bond that connects one person to another across time and space Ainsworth; Bowlby Attachment does not have to be reciprocal. One person may have an attachment to an individual which is not shared.

Evaluation of three attachment style theories

By Saul McLeodupdated Attachment is a deep and enduring emotional bond that connects one person to another across time and space Ainsworth; Bowlby Attachment does not have to be reciprocal. One person may have an attachment to an individual which is not shared. Attachment is characterized by specific behaviors in children, such as seeking proximity to the attachment figure when upset or threatened Bowlby, Such behavior appears universal across cultures.

Attachment theory explains how the parent-child relationship emerges and influences subsequent development. Attachment theory in psychology originates with the seminal work of John Bowlby Specifically, it shaped his belief about the link between early infant separations with the mother and later maladjustment, and led Bowlby to formulate his attachment theory.

John Bowlbyworking alongside James Robertson observed that children experienced intense distress when separated from their mothers. The behavioral theory of attachment stated that the child becomes attached to the mother because she fed the infant.

Bowlby defined attachment as a 'lasting psychological connectedness between human beings. This is illustrated in the work of Lorenz and Harlow Most researchers believe that attachment develops through a series of stages.

Stages of Attachment Rudolph Schaffer and Peggy Emerson studied 60 babies at monthly intervals for the first 18 months of life this is known as a longitudinal study.

Mary Ainsworth | Attachment Styles | Simply Psychology

The children were all studied in their own home, and a regular pattern was identified in the development of attachment. The babies were visited monthly for approximately one year, their interactions with their carers were observed, and carers were interviewed.

A diary was kept by the mother to examine the evidence for the development of attachment. Three measures were recorded: Stranger Anxiety - response to the arrival of a stranger.

Separation Anxiety - distress level when separated from a carer, the degree of comfort needed on return. Social Referencing - the degree a child looks at their carer to check how they should respond to something new secure base.

They discovered that baby's attachments develop in the following sequence: Asocial 0 - 6 weeks Very young infants are asocial in that many kinds of stimuli, both social and non-social, produce a favorable reaction, such as a smile.

Indiscriminate Attachments 6 weeks to 7 months Infants indiscriminately enjoy human company, and most babies respond equally to any caregiver. They get upset when an individual ceases to interact with them. From 3 months infants smile more at familiar faces and can be easily comfortable by a regular caregiver.

Specific Attachment 7 - 9 months Special preference for a single attachment figure. The baby looks to particular people for security, comfort, and protection. It shows fear of strangers stranger fear and unhappiness when separated from a special person separation anxiety.

Some babies show stranger fear and separation anxiety much more frequently and intensely than others, nevertheless, they are seen as evidence that the baby has formed an attachment.

This has usually developed by one year of age. Multiple Attachment 10 months and onwards The baby becomes increasingly independent and forms several attachments.

By 18 months the majority of infants have formed multiple attachments. The results of the study indicated that attachments were most likely to form with those who responded accurately to the baby's signals, not the person they spent more time with.

Schaffer and Emerson called this sensitive responsiveness. Intensely attached infants had mothers who responded quickly to their demands and, interacted with their child. Infants who were weakly attached had mothers who failed to interact. Many of the babies had several attachments by ten months old, including attachments to mothers, fathers, grandparents, siblings, and neighbors.What is Your Attachment Style?

Attachment, Communication with Children, Parenting, Three Principles to Raise Free and Happy Kids.

Evaluation of three attachment style theories

the video especially, the mere mention of mirror neurons as sponges (long discredited theory in Macaques) renders the whole premise of attachment styles causing attachment styles, well garbage.

Reply. Attachment Theory (Bowlby) 2 years ago • Child Development Theories, Learning Theories & Models • 1 Summary: Attachment theory emphasizes the importance of a secure and trusting mother-infant bond on development and well-being.

Attachment theory is a concept in developmental psychology that concerns the importance of "attachment" in regards to personal development. Specifically, it makes the claim that the ability for an individual to form an emotional and physical "attachment" to another person gives a sense of stability.

the original attachment Three-Category Meas ure (Hazan & Shaver, ) by rewording the descriptions of each of the attachment styles, and by adding a fourth style –dismissing-avoidant. Dismissing-avoidant people are characterized as avoiding intimacy, being highly self-reliant.

The anxious–preoccupied attachment style in adults corresponds to the anxious-ambivalent attachment style in children. However, the dismissive-avoidant attachment style and the fearful-avoidant attachment style, which are distinct in adults, correspond to a single avoidant attachment style in children.

Attachment theory is one of the most studied aspects of psychology today. Bowlby and Ainsworth's attachment models are common references in attachment theory research. The attachment model explains infant behavior towards their attachment figure, during separation and reunion times.

Attachment in adults - Wikipedia